Wolverine’s Wednesday Whips: The Ford Mustang

1964_Ford_Mustang_Convertible_(14175159527)So, I forgot to post yesterday in honor of National Mustang Day. April 17th might seem like a very odd day to memorialize such a famous American automobile; so why that day? On March the 9th, 1964 the first Mustang; a Wimbledon White convertible with a 260-cubic inch V-8 engine; rolled off the assembly line in Dearborn, Michigan. A little more than a month later, on April 17th, 1964 the Ford Mustang debuted at the World’s Fair in Flushing Meadows, New York. It was on that stage that a legacy was born. The introduction of the Mustang started a new class of cars commonly known as: the pony car. The Mustang’s styling caught the world’s eye and grew in popularity. It also inspired a lot of the competition which are known now as the Significant 7 (The Ford Mustang, The Chevrolet Camaro, The Pontiac Trams Am, The Plymouth ‘Cuda, The Mercury Cougar, Dodge Challenger, The AMC AMX). The Mustang was originally sold as just a hardtop and convertible option; but in August of 1964, customers could also get a fastback version.

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The first-generation Mustang was relatively unchanged from 1964 through 1973. Lee Iacocca, who was one of the original creators behind the original Mustang, had became President of Ford Motor Company by the time 1974 rolled around and in response to the oil crisis; he ordered the design team to create a smaller, more fuel-efficient Mustang. Dubbed the Mustang II, it didn’t really have anything in common with the preceding model. it was ultimately based on the Ford Pinto subcompact car and made its debut on September 21, 1973 (two months before the oil crisis). The reduced size allowed the car to be competitive against the newly imported Japanese Toyota Celica and the European Ford built compact car, the Mercury Capri. The 1975 saw the inclusion of a V8 option after the 1974 models were only available in the 2.3 liter inline four cylinder from the Ford Pinto or the 2.8 liter Cologne V6 found in the Mercury Capri. The 302 cubic inch (4.9 L) Windsor V8 was only available with a C-4 automatic transmission. It continued to be this way until the end of the Mustang II which was in 1978.

The third generation of the Mustang saw a complete change. The new Mustang was based on the larger Fox body platform (other Fox body cars include the Ford Fairmont and Mercury Zephyr). With the larger body, the Mustang had an increased wheelbase which yielded more space. The larger engine bay, back seat and trunk capacity was a big hit with buyers. Ford now offered a coupe (aka the notchback), hatchback, and convertible and with each variation offered a variety of packages and engine options.

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In November of 1993, a car code-named the “SN-95” was debuted. The Mustang saw its first redesign in 15 years and incorporated styling cues from earlier Mustangs but was very different at the same time. For the first time since 1964; the Mustang was not available in a coupe (aka notchback) model. The Mustang came as either a 3.8 OHV V6 or a V8. The Mustang also, after nearly 30 years of use retired the 302 cid pushrod small-block V8 and was replaced with a modular 4.6 L 281 cid SOHC V8 for the 1996 model year. In 1999 was again reskinned  The interior, proportions and chassis were remained the same but the 1999-2004 Mustang had Ford’s new styling with sharper contours and creases in its bodywork.

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Code-named the “S-197” (I guess they use a lot of code names in the car business) was introduced at the 2004 North American Auto Show. The newly re-designed 2005 model year Mustang was reminiscent of the fastback Mustang from the late-1960s. The car not only saw a newly designed exterior with a reduced drag coefficient while the engine was unchanged, the interior saw a few upgrades.

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The sixth generation brings us to present day. Back in 2015, Ford debuted yet another rendition of the famous Mustang. The current Mustang is as popular as ever and whether we’re referring to the Ford direct cars or the many variations modified by companies (ie Shelby, Saleen, Roush) throughout the years; Mustangs are the American muscle car. I’m sure that any Camaro fan would disagree with me in emphasizing the cultural significance of this car but since my first car was a Fox-body Mustang; I am slightly partial.


 

Images:

1964 Ford Mustang Convertible by Sicnag – 1964 Ford Mustang Convertible, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=40645649

1978 Ford Mustang King Cobra by Sicnag – 1978 Ford Mustang King Cobra, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=40645475

1980 Ford Mustang Ghia Hatchback by Sicnag – 1980 Ford Mustang Ghia Hatchback, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=40645609

Featured Image – 1993 Ford Mustang SVT Cobra Hatchback by Sicnag – 1993 Ford Mustang SVT Cobra Hatchback, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=40645591

1995 Ford Mustang GT by Kieran White from Manchester, England – 1995 Ford Mustang 5.0 GT, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=38606091

Mustang by Ben – Mustang, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=66494677

Geneva Motor Show 2014 (photo taken on first press day) by Norbert Aepli, Switzerland, CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=31448683

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Wolverine’s Wednesday Whips: The Dodge M4S

I was re-watching the 1984 version of Red Dawn the other day and I was reminded at how many big stars came from that cast. Despite his tumultuous headline making personal life which was fueled with drug induced outbursts, knowingly having sex with over 200 partners after learning he had HIV, and allegations of domestic violence; Charlie Sheen has been in some very entertaining movies and TV shows. Charlie Sheen was all over the place throughout the 80s well into the 2000s. But one of my favorite Charlie Sheen movies was the cult classic independent action-horror flick: The Wraith. As a child, I was obsessed with cars. I guess you could say that I still am. Infamous movie vehicles like Smokey and the Bandit, Cobra, or Cannonball Run; or TV shows like The Dukes of Hazard and Knight Rider fueled cars to be a pivotal part of movie culture. The 80s were full of iconic TV and movie vehicles and some even went a step above that. Movies like Christine, The Car and even Maximum Overdrive showcase vehicles who come to life and reek havoc. The same year that Emilio Estevez starred in Maximum Overdrive; his brother Charlie Sheen starred in The Wraith.

the wraith movie still 2The Wraith centers around teenager Jamie Hankins, who has been mysteriously murdered at the hands of the psychotic leader of a ruthless gang of car thieves. He comes back to life seeking revenge and to save his girlfriend who is now being intimidatingly possessed by the gang leader. He shows up covered from head-to-toe in black body armor and a black race helmet. No one is aware of who the driver actually is and as he quickly beats them at their own street racing game; he takes the members of the gang out one-by-one.

What makes him even more unique is that his vessel of revenge is a groundbreaking concept car: an all black Dodge M4S Turbo Interceptor. The Dodge M4S (M4S meaning Mid-engine 4-cylinder sports car) was a prototype sports coupe that was built by Dodge in 1981 to literally demonstrate the current technology held by the company. Despite reportedly costing Dodge around $1.5 million to create, the concept car was the wraith movie stillcommissioned and paid for by PPG Industries. The powerhouse came at the hands of a 2.2 liter four cylinder Cosworth-headed 16 valve 14 cylinder twin-cam engine with dual Garrett T25 turbochargers and a Bosch fuel injection system. It made between 440 and 500 horsepower; while having roughly the same torque; before experts from Ferrari and Lamborghini were called in to help produce an a whopping 800 hp from the mid-engine 2.2 liter. The high horsepower output was handled by a hand-built 5 speed transmission and the record speed was clocked at 195 mph. The body was a streamline 2-door coupe that was comparable to the Lamborghini, Ford GT or Ferrari.  The M4S, now more commonly known as the Turbo Interceptor, was a supercar that would go on to influence car makers for years to come. The twin-turbo setup was later adopted by Porsche and Toyota.

Dodge M4S Pace CarDodge provided the filmmakers the molds to create six exact replicas of the M4S body to create stunt and dummy cars to be used in the film. Four basic shells were created to be used in the crash and explosion scenes; while two drivable stunt cars were made for racing footage. Due to launching to 60 mph in just over four seconds and having a top speed of nearly 190 mph car, a reckless stunt driver for the movie almost died. The original car, which was so powerful had to be toned down for the sake of the filmmakers, was used for the movie’s close-up shots. Sadly, the car never went into production. The original Dodge Turbo Interceptor is now housed at the Walter P. Chrysler Museum in Auburn Hills, MI. Thankfully those old molds are being used to create kit cars; so that is our only hope of ever getting our hands on one of these beautiful supercars…unless of course you are one of the lucky people to have purchased one of the extras from the movie studio.



 

Images:

The Wraith movie stills attributed to New Cinema, Fair Use.

Featured Image – Dodge M4S Pace Car photo by and attributed to Joe Pappas, Fair Use.

 

 

Wolverine’s Wednesday Whips: the Van

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The first image that pop’s into your head when you think of a van is probably some minivan driven by a 30-something soccer mom. If you were a child of the 80s like me, your first thought may be the now infamous pop culture icon that is the 1983 black GMC Vandura van with iconic red stripe and black and red turbine mag wheels used by the A-Team. Others may envision Scooby Doo riding shotgun in the Mystery Machine, or a group of hippies piling out of a Volkswagen bus. Whatever that vision might be, its a vehicle that we are all familiar with.

The van can trace its name back to the mid 19th century use of the word caravan; which referred to a covered wagon transporting goods (earliest reported record is 1829). This of course referred to one wagon which was an extension of the word caravan which at one Roger_Fenton's_waggontime meant a convoy of multiple wagons. The word van is used interchangeably for a variety of vehicles (mini van, cargo vans, passenger vans, box trucks, panel vans, etc etc); but the history and evolution of the van deserves more respect than that of some soccer mom with 3 kids in tow on the way to ballet practice with one daughter after dropping off another daughter at a soccer game. The van has been a staple in personal as well as business related transportation for over a century. So how does something with such a long resume of use all over the world became the stereotypical ‘mom’ vehicle?

A van is a vehicle used for transporting goods or people. Sounds simple enough right? But depending on the type of van, the van could be larger th1937_Terraplane_Coach.jpgan a full size SUV (ie the Ford Transit van) while a mini MPV is essentially a compact car with a large hatchback roof (ie the Fiat 500L). The precursor to what we now know as a van in America can trace its way back to the delivery Sedans of the 1930s to late 1950s and looked similar to a station wagon or car with a large back area for storage. It wasn’t until the 1960s that we see contact vans, like the Volkswagen Bus. Over the decades to come, standard or full size vans were produced by most major companies: Ford, Chevrolet, Dodge, Chrysler. Full size vans were equipped with seats and could transport up to 15 passengers at a time, while that same van could be equipped by for the businessman. Painters, cleaners, etc could literally carry their company’s equipment with them in the back of the van.

Stout_Scarab_Gilmore_Car_Museum_2011-11-11_02-28-05.jpgAt the same time that transport vehicles appeared to be more like sedans with large backs used primarily for deliver; the van was evolving on other end of the spectrum. In 1936 Stout Scarab created a vehicle with the second row seats that could turn 180 degrees to face the rear and a removal table. Then in 1949, the DKW Schnellaster was the first vehicle to feature the physical characteristics of the modern day minivan. A prominent minivan feature was introduced in 1968 when Volkswagen even introduced the sliding side door on their van. This sliding door was found on the 1984 Chrysler minivan which arrived on the market and quite literally replaced the station wagon as the passenger car of choice in the US. The minivan, yes the minivan, was described in the 1986_Dodge_Caravan_Smithsonian_National_Museum_of_American_History_4.jpgNew York Times as one of the “hot cars coming out of Detroit” but as time went on the minivan’s market share peaked in 2000 with sales slowing dramatically. A New York Times journalist in 2016 wrote that minivans had just became “uncool at any speed”. Despite minivan sales increasing in 2013; sales were literally cut in half nationwide from the year 2000. But thanks to the renovations of the Honda Odyssey, Toyota Sienna and Chrysler minivans, the minivan is helping keep the van treading water. Many servicemen are turning in their trucks with work beds for a more comfortable ride in something like the new Ford Transit cargo van. Between the light commercial vehicles and the minivan…maybe we can ride past the negative stigma that vans have received in recent years. Maybe we can ride by in a minivan…in a captains chair watching Spongebob on a 19 inch television monitor hanging from the roof. 😉

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Images:

A-Team Van image By Wonker Wonker from London, United Kingdom derivative work: Btr – A-Team_Van.jpg, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=11122072

Roger Fenton’s photographic van, 1855 by and accredited to Roger Fenton (1819–1869) – This image is available from the United States Library of Congress’s Prints and Photographs division under the digital ID cph.3g09240. Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2280085

1937 Terraplane Coach image by Alden Jewell – 1937 Terraplane Coach, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=58019573

1946 Stout Scarab Experimental image by and attributed to Joanna Poe – Flickr: 2011-11-11_02-28-05, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=19165046

Featured Image – 1986 Dodge Caravan (at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History), by and accredited to user CZmarlin (Christopher Ziemnowicz), – Fair use, CC0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=45890796

2017 Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid image accredited to Mariordo (Mario Roberto Durán Ortiz) – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=55799835

Ford Transit van accredited to Makizox – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=62384550

Wolverine’s Wednesday Whips: NASCAR edition

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The first thought that comes to mind when most Americans outside of the South think about NASCAR is not moon shining. Over the years the media has portrayed NASCAR as the Redneck’s sport of choice. Excuse me…they wouldn’t use the word sport. Even though I am not an avid NASCAR fan, NASCAR is a celebrated competition that is as American as apple pie. So grab your smoked turkey leg, crack your Bud Light and let’s drive down pit row to investigate this misunderstood ‘sport’.

Nascar_race_from_the_1950sEver since the invent of the automobile, we have tried to make them better and faster. Making them faster means that someone has to be the fastest. From the first automobie race held in the United States that was sponsored by a Chicago newspaper in 1895 to the 20s and 30s when the United States became the place to race. After Daytona Beach, FL 1963_Ford_Galaxie_NASCARbecame the go to place for fast-round track style racing while the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah had become synonymous as locations to break speed records. Years after Bill France Sr. moved to Florida to better himself during the Great Depression; he founded the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing after racers needed a legitimate promotion since a lot of charlatans were promoting racing events and skipping town before ever paying the racers their winnings. France sat down with other influential racers and promoters in late 1947 to iron out sanctions, standardize rules, create a schedule, and a ‘final championship’. This led to rules being scribbled down on a bar room napkin and the creation of the “NASCAR” league in early 1948.

NASCAR_43From 1948 on, NASCAR grew in popularity. With greats like Cale Yarborough, Richard Petty, Dale Earnhardt Sr, to current champions like Chase Elliott, Dale Earnhart Jr, Jimmie Johnson and even the recently retired Jeff Gordon; racers have immense fan bases while merchandise sales (hats, shirts, jackets, replica cars) are a multi-million dollar asset to the NASCAR brand. So how can a sport that has been around since the invent of the automobile and having been organized since 1948 get such a bad rap? How does a sport with a yearly revenue of over $3 billion with an estimated 75 million fans world wide over 3.6 million individual attendants of races worldwide still get a bad rap?

People outside of the set demographic just don’t understand NASCAR. I myself am not a huge fan because I would rather watch drag racing (which is a completely different and misunderstood entity) or football for that matter; but NASCAR has not been targeted to all Americans. In the 1970s, the demographic was the blue collar Americans (specifically
Dale_Earnhardt_Jr_carSoutherners) who enjoyed the cold Budweiser and Winston cigarettes who proudly sponsored the events. Maybe the negative views came from the fact that stock car racing in the United States can trace its origins back to these Southern ‘shine runners’ who boasted about having the fastest car after prohibition. The possibilities are endless as to why you wouldn’t like NASCAR and maybe you’ll just end up being one of those cynical people that makes jokes about going fast and turning left; but, if you attend a race then you’ll be on your feet with a drink in one hand and a smoked turkey leg in the other…screaming for your favorite driver to wheel his numbered car to the finish line before all of the other numbered cars.

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NASCAR on Fox logo by and accredited to Thenascarguide – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=47924513
1958 NASCAR race image by and accredited to Notch8864 – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=46437509
1963 Ford Galaxie NASCAR image by-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=131516By Eagle Shooter at flickr – http://www.flickr.com/photos/waynew/119439841/in/photostream/, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=767012
Richard Petty’s 1973 Dodge Charger image by and accredited to dodge challenger1 – originally posted to Flickr as challenger run 527, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=5847784
Dale Earnhardt Jr Car on racetrack image by and accredited to USCG photo by PA3 Kimberly Wilder – United States Coast Guard https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=682594
2013 NASCAR Toyota Camry image by and accredited to Alf van Beem – Own work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=55156882
(Featured Image) Las Vegas NASCAR image by https://pixabay.com/en/users/WikiImages-1897/https://pixabay.com/en/car-racing-nascar-race-track-67525/, CC0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=24974861

 

I knew it was only a matter of “Time”

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600px-SDCC_2014_-_Masters_of_the_Universe_(7752978172)Sometimes the only thing it takes is just time for all of the things that you dreamed of getting as a child, to be available to you when you are older. Unless you dreamed of owning a dragon or wanted to become a super hero, then you can pretty much fulfill your childhood dreams. GI Joe fans can join the Marines. Masters of the Universe fanatics can purchase He-Man’s power sword or Star Trek’s Trekkies can learn Klyngon while wielding the infamous Bat’leth. We can cosplay as Deadpool all day long while visiting our favorite Con. If we have the money can rock a mustache and black cowboy hat while driving 100 MPH in a black 1977 Smokey and the Bandit style Pontiac Firebird or sit back playing an Atari in a 1986 KITT Pontiac Trans Am. Carpentry ready fans can build a TARDIS in their backyard. Or those of us with a big imagination can travel back in time after they hit 88 MPH in their own Delorean. Is it exactly the same as we dreamed? Definitely not. But things usually are different than they seemed when we were little. Reality usually sits in but that doesn’t mean that we can’t have fun a little!

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For those of us born in the 80s, the realization of fulfilling our dreams is a little bit closer thanks to O’Reilly Auto Parts. Well….kind of. Anyways, go to the O’Reilly Auto Part’s website and search for Part #121G. Trust me!!! You won’t be upset that you did.

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Featured Image: He-Man is a TimeLord image by Chris Favero from USA – He-Man is a TimeLord?, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=34364586
Smokey and the Bandit Trans Am image by and accredited to Pat Loika – LBCC-1, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=42451758
He-Man, She-Ra and Teela cosplay image by and accredited to Ryan Quick from Greenbelt, MD, USA – Masters of the Universe, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=42384853
Knight Rider KITT car image by and accredited to Thomas R Machnitzki (thomas@machnitzki.com) – Own work, CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=19551841
Delorean image by and accredited to Spanish Coches – DMC Delorean, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=38114628

Life Hack: Car Headlight Restoration

If you’re like me and your finances force you to keep a vehicle for long enough that you have to do more than the normal amounts of maintenance and repairs, then this life hack is for you. Sometimes, cosmetically, your aging car needs some TLC. This was literally shown to me before my very eyes the other night when I was driving my 2006 Honda Ridgeline. I was driving back home the other night when my wife asked if I had my headlights on, to which I honestly had to check and make sure. My lights were on but my headlights were so dim that it appeared that they were not.

I walked outside the next morning and found the reason that my headlights were so dim. img_1627The headlight was old and dull. It looked like someone had taken sandpaper and scratched up the whole thing. Over the years of being a car guy, I knew that they made headlight restoration kits and while I was in O’Reilly Auto Parts buying parts, I decided to check out the ‘kit’. The kit that they were selling, need I say ‘minimal’ and definitely not worth the $9.99 price tag. (Besides the negative reviews that I read about the product online.) So I decided to do a little DIY investigation. Turns out the more expensive kits have an abrasive compound and something to apply it with. My wife and I pretty much simultaneously thought, ‘abrasive material = toothpaste’ and what better applicator than an abrasive dish towel and elbow grease.

So I went to the dollar store and purchased a $1 tube of Crest toothpaste and a $1 pack of dish cloths. I brought a galloon of water to help rinse everything off. to make a long story short, after a minute and a half of scrubbing the headlights with the toothpaste, the headlights look good as new. So save your  money and use a little bit of elbow grease and $2’s worth of items and you’ll improve the appearance of your ride by 1000%.

Top Cat’s Tuesday Top 10: James Bond movies

In 1952 Ian Fleming introduced the world to a character who would change the face of popcasino-royale-book-cover culture forever. His name was Bond. James Bond. A British secret service agent who loves beautiful women and likes his martini shaken not stirred. Fleming’s first Bond novel, Casino Royale, was the first in many successful books and short stories. Fleming’s wartime service for the British Naval Intelligence Division during WWII allowed him to have all of the details that he needed to write 11 Bond related books and multiple other short stories between 1953 and 1966. The James Bond character which has appeared in film twenty-six times and has been portrayed by seven actors has been popular since Dr. No’s release in 1962. But despite who portrayed James Bond (codename 007) in the movies they were relatively a hit. From 1962 to the latest Bond movie that was made in 2015; it is obvious that I would have a few that rose above the rest on my favorites list.

So here are my Top Cat’s Top 10 James Bond movies:

10. License to Kill 

license-to-kill-bond-movieThe 80s produced a lot of things and the 16th James Bond movie was one of them. Timothy Dalton stars in his second and final Bond movie in the first movie not use the title of an Ian Fleming story. The movie showed Bond in a more violent, darker Bond than people had been used to but it was just what people in the 80s had been looking for.

9. Die Another Day

die-another-day-posterBefore our blue eyed blonde Bond stole the screen in Casino Royale, Pierce Brosnan took to the big screen and portrayed Bond in four spy films. In Die Another Day the MI6 agent is betrayed and imprisoned. He spends 14 months in prison and must then track down his betrayer. It’s a typical Bond storyline but the CGI of the movie is…..well…a little off putting. The redeeming factor? Halle Berry. Even though Pierce Brosnan is by far my least favorite Bond, Die Another Day’s action scenes and story line were almost as beautiful as Halle Berry.

8. Dr. No

dr no.jpgSean Connery was the first to don the on screen James Bond persona. Since Dr. No is not the first James Bond movie, the movie fills in movie goers who have not read the books. The movie also introduces us to the criminal organization SPECTRE (which appears in all six subsequent movies, as well as in the Daniel Craig movies). In Dr. No, Bond travels to Jamaica to investigate the disappearance of another 00 agent. He finds Dr. No, who is trying to destroy America’s first human spaceflight program with a radio wave weapon. Bond frees the bikini clad beauty that he had met earlier in the movie and boils Dr. No in the water from a nuclear reactor. The two escape in a boat as Dr. No’s lair explodes in the distance. The movie begins a chain reaction of popular James Bond movies and many other mock spy movies. Dr. No made James Bond a house hold name and it has remained there since 1962. And I don’t see it leaving any time soon.

7. Quantam of Solace

quantum-of-solaceAfter we were introduced to Daniel Craig’s pastiche of the James Bond character in 2006’s Casino Royale, James not only seeks revenge over the death of his love but must also try to stop a mysterious organization who is hell bent on destroying the world’s most valuable resource. The movie delves us deeper into the psyche of 007. We also get to see the convoluted relationship between M and Bond deepen.

6. From Russia With Love

from_russia_with_love_posterIn 1963’s From Russia with Love, which is our second James Bond movie (second time with Sean Connery at the helm) and this storyline takes our favorite agent to Russia where he battles rogue agents of the KGB and from, what it seems, every SPECTRE agent alive to keep a decoding machine out of the hands of SPECTRE. He finds a beautiful girl (of course) and defeats all of the bad guys. This and every James Bond movie, the tag line should be “His new enemies, His new women, His new Adventures!”

5. Goldfinger

goldfingerA bad guy who loves gold and ironically has the last name of Goldfinger whose driver is a super strong henchman who can chop people’s heads off by throwing his derby hat after getting off the plane being flown by a gorgeous woman named Pussy Galore? Yeah. I’ll watch that. In the beginning Bond makes Goldfinger look like a fool and steals his girl. Well while he’s out handling business, Goldfinger has her gilded. Yes. You heard me right. Bond tracks Goldfinger down and finally gets caught. When he thinks he has it all under control, he realizes that he has his work cut out for him when it came to taming the gorgeous Pussy Galore but his real work was the fight between he and Oddjob (the driver/henchman) after he breaks out of Goldfinger’s prison. He stops them from breaking into Fort Knox’s gold reserve and gets the girl.

4. Casino Royale (2006)

casino-royaleAll James Bond fans were apprehensive when we found out that there was going to be a new Bond. Especially because this bond had shockingly beautiful blue eyes, blonde hair and a sculpted body. But as a fan, I can say that within the first 10 minutes I looked at my best friend (also a big Bond fan) and smiled. We both were pleased with the studios choice and Casino Royale easily became my favorite Bond movie at that time. Movies series get better with time because of increased graphics and the fact that more money is spent in production (ie Marvel’s The Avengers, X-Men, etc). Oh…about the movie. Our favorite fictional MI6 agent James Bond finds himself at the beginning of his 00 career. He is just earning his “license to kill” (definitely pun intended) and of course proves his awesomeness. The new time line follows Casino Royale with Quantam of Solace, Skyfall and Spectre.

3. You Only Live Twice

you-only-live-twiceJames Bond + Ninja powered Japanese secret service agents + gorgeous women + threat of nuclear war + Spaceships hijacking other country’s space capsules + a great opening/theme song = a great movie. SPECTRE is behind the theft of an American Space Capsule and their journey to start WWIII is thwarted by 007.

2. Spectre

spectreA lot of us fear that Spectre will be the last time that we see Daniel Craig as Bond and if it is, we will not be able to deny his amazing run. In Spectre, we find Bond following a cryptic message left to him by a deceased M. Bond starts to unravel and piece together the hell that he has went through during his whole 00 career. Bond begins to uncover the deep layers of deceit that have been the misreable truth that is SPECTRE. The movie ends with Bond riding off into the sunset with the newest of his many loves.

1. Skyfall

skyfallThe last and final movie on our list is Skyfall. The second to the last Bond movie that has been created. I hope that it is one in a long line of Bond movies. I hope that it is also one in a long line of movies that have Daniel Craig as the lead. This Bond movie showcases a time where his assignment goes really wrong and all of the agents around the world are exposed. The MI6 building is attacked and M has to utilize the one person in the world that she trusts: Bond. Bond follows a baited trail to what ends up being a shady figure from M’s past.